Posts filed under: Transportation

Sandra Piccirilli, PE, has joined as Vice President and Florida Transportation Lead where she will oversee transportation operations and business development for our Tampa Bay office.

A 35-year industry veteran, Sandra is an accomplished leader who brings a wealth of technical and commercial expertise needed to build world-class projects in both the public and private sectors. With an extensive background in civil design and construction engineering, Sandra has a unique understanding of complex engineering design and has helped spearhead numerous projects in the civil, environmental, and transportation arenas. Notable projects include the Tampa International Airport expansion, New Tampa/Interstate-75 bridge, Houston Shipping Channel Bridge, the Interstate-4 Ultimate PP Design-Build Project, Water Works Park and sections of the Tampa Riverwalk.

Sandra is active in several industry-related organizations including the American Society of Civil Engineers and Florida Engineering Society. She serves on the University of South Florida College Engineering Advisory Board. In addition, Sandra is a licensed attorney who has litigated all phases of civil, construction and governmental cases in state and federal courts.

The Michigan Section of the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) selected Martin Parker, Jr., PE, to receive its President’s Award. The award recognizes a transportation professional who has made an outstanding contribution to the practice of traffic or transportation engineering. Judges commended Martin’s technical expertise, dedication to mentoring younger engineers, and high-level state and national project experience.

A Senior Traffic Engineer with more than 50 years of experience, Martin provides expert transportation planning and engineering; traffic operations analysis; roadway, traffic signal and highway design; and safety management services to clients. He is involved in almost every Wade Trim transportation project, including traffic impact studies for new developments and campus expansions such as the Ford Research and Engineering Center in Dearborn and Michigan State University. Martin also provides leadership and assistance on multiple Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) roadway design and construction projects, as well as Master Plans and implementation plans such as the City of Battle Creek Non-Motorized Transportation Network Master Plan.

Martin has been instrumental in making Wade Trim a recognized leader in traffic signing and safety, with extensive experience in signing plans, including on MDOT sign upgrade projects in all MDOT Regions, 82 miles of completed freeway sign projects, and over 2,000 miles of non-freeway sign projects.

On the national level, Martin has worked with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to study crash problems and countermeasures for urban arterials, determine safety and operational impacts of median types used on urban arterials, and evaluate right-turn-on-red. He also helped develop the national, knowledge-based expert system for setting speed limits, and wrote several traffic and safety reports and training manuals for the FHWA and various state and local agencies.

Martin was honored on October 12 during the ITE Michigan Technical Session at the Van Buren ISD Conference Center.

Doug Smith, PE, has joined as Wade Trim’s Transportation Market Segment Lead, where he will oversee all transportation-related services across the company. He brings 30 years of experience in transportation planning and design, finance, structural engineering, software engineering, and construction. Serving in a Principal role, Doug has provided quality review and technical guidance to projects for Departments of Transportation, transit agencies, transportation authorities, and airports throughout the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast US. He stays attuned to the evolution of transportation technologies as well as how demographic shifts are affecting transportation planning and agencies’ abilities to respond.

Doug has long been actively involved in the Ohio Transportation Engineering Conference Program Planning Committee as well as the Transportation Research Board’s Revenue and Finance Committee and Cyber Security Subcommittee. He is also a member of the American Road and Transportation Builders Association and American Council of Engineering Companies. He holds an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh, an MS in Civil Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and a BS in Civil Engineering from The Ohio State University.

Roadway, pedestrian and aesthetic upgrades completed along the SR 585 corridor through the City of Tampa’s Ybor City District transformed this former truck route into an inviting, historic neighborhood corridor that supports all users and modes of transportation, safety, economic growth and livability. The Florida Institute of Consulting Engineers (FICE) selected the SR 585 Urban Corridor Modification project for two 2017 awards: The Excellence in Engineering Honor Award and the FICE Transportation Committee’s Outstanding Special Project.

As designer on the project, Wade Trim worked with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District 7, City of Tampa, Ybor City Development Corporation, Barrio Latino Commission, and local businesses and residents to restore this transportation corridor. Extending 2.75 miles from SR 60 to SR 600, the project narrowed and enhanced the corridor through a “roadway diet” and a “complete streets” design approach to accommodate pedestrians, bicyclists and public transportation, while transferring ownership from FDOT to the City of Tampa. Heavy truck traffic on SR 585 (21st and 22nd Streets) through Ybor City between I-4 and the Port of Tampa divided and eroded this National Historic Landmark District for decades. Completion of the I-4 Connector diverted most truck traffic off local roads and made the SR 585 Corridor Modification project possible.

Along with a comprehensive public involvement program to address desires and concerns of stakeholders and local community organizations, construction sequencing and a Maintenance of Traffic Plan minimized the economic impact of construction by maintaining business access and traffic capacity. The existing 100-year-old storm sewer system was retrofitted to accommodate a narrower roadway, and new LED traffic signal and pedestrian count-down displays were installed. Historical five-globe lighting, granite curb, and recycled brick paver crosswalks were also selected to reflect the area’s culture and history while maintaining current standards.

In addition to the FICE awards, the project received the Hillsborough County City-County Planning Commission Chairman’s Award in 2016 for excellence in planning and design, contributing to a better quality of life, and serving as a model to learn from and emulate.

Four bridges constructed in the 1920s over the Grand Trunk Railroad in Detroit, now the Dequindre Cut Greenway, had become structurally deficient and in extremely poor condition. Wade Trim designed the replacement of three of these bridges (Wilkins, Division and Adelaide) and the removal and site restoration for the fourth bridge (Alfred) for the City of Detroit Department of Public Works. The bridge replacements were critical to transforming this abandoned greenway corridor into a multi-modal link and downtown recreational and commercial destination. The bridges also provided improved links for trucking in and out of Eastern Market. The project received the American Public Works Association Michigan Chapter’s (APWA MI) Project of the Year Award for Structures ($1 million to $5 million) at the Chapter’s Great Lakes Expo at the Grand Traverse Resort in Acme, MI.

The Dequindre Cut runs below street level and is one of a series of Link Detroit projects recently completed by the City of Detroit, in collaboration with several public and non-profit organizations, to connect 20 miles of continuous walking and biking paths linking downtown, midtown, Eastern Market, the Detroit riverfront and Hamtramck. The bridges are two-span, precast concrete arch structures with precast concrete wing walls that tie into existing cast-in-place concrete retaining walls. Wide sidewalks were incorporated into all the bridges to help pedestrians and other non-motorized users access Eastern Market, the Midtown Loop Phase IV pathway, and the Dequindre Cut. Bike paths were added at the Wilkins Street bridge and room for future bike paths was incorporated into the other bridges.

Special care was taken to work near existing utilities and buildings in this urban area. The bridge replacements are supported on steel H-piles that extend 130 feet to bear on hardpan. With the tight constraints of existing adjacent buildings, a two-stage piling operation was used during construction to minimize vibrations on the buildings. Vibration monitoring was conducted to measure effects to the existing buildings to prevent damage. In addition, with the tight right-of-way at each bridge, precast retaining walls were used instead of conventional concrete footings that would have interfered with building foundations. Precast concrete was utilized to eliminate bulking forming and supports necessary for cast-in-place concrete, again due to the tight constraints of the builidngs.

Bridge aesthetics were designed to blend with adjacent buildings and structures as well as other projects in the area. Concrete bridge and wall railings match the 1928 concrete rails while meeting the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) requirements. A pedestrian fence design similar to existing bridge fencing along the Midtown Loop was incorporated into all four locations to create a similar look. Lighting on and under the bridges will provide security at the bridges and pathway. The streetlight fixtures mounted at each bridge corner match the lights of the Eastern Market improvement project. The renewed bridges are important features that draw visitors to the Dequindre Cut and provide access to key recreational and commercial destinations in Detroit.

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Wade Trim Professional Engineer Robert Breen (center left) accepted the Project of the Year Award for Structures from APWA MI representatives at the Chapter’s Great Lakes Expo at the Grand Traverse Resort in Acme, MI.

Jeremy Schrot, PE, joined our Municipal Services Group in Flint, MI, as a Project Manager where he works with municipal and private clients and supports business development efforts. He has more than 10 years of experience in local community and transportation infrastructure projects with varied scopes and funding sources.

Currently, Jeremy is managing a Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) pathway project, a dam removal project, and a grit chamber rehabilitation project. He brings previous experience working on MDOT roadway reconstruction and rehabilitation projects, an EPA Superfund water transmission main, and infrastructure improvements for the University of Michigan and Eastern Michigan University.

Jeremy is a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers and its Michigan society, and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from Michigan Technological University.

Mark Schluter, PE, joined our Construction Group in Roanoke, TX, as a Senior Project Manager who specializes in transportation design, planning, and construction engineering and inspection (CEI). He brings 40 years of experience managing design and construction of roadway and freeway projects and will lead efforts to expand our transportation work in Texas.

Mark spent 30 years working for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Fort Worth District in transportation operations, bridge and structure design, advanced roadway project planning and schematics, CEI, and facilities maintenance. For the past 10 years, he has served as a consultant on design and CEI projects for various Tarrant County municipalities and TxDOT. Mark’s major local experience includes managing one of TxDOT’s largest design-bid-build contracts, the IH 30/SH 360 Interchange in Arlington’s Entertainment District, as well as design and construction of the SH 114 freeway through Southlake and Grapevine.

Actively involved in the Fort Worth area, Mark is president of the Northwest Independent School District, an executive board member of the 35W Coalition, and a member of the TxDOT-FTW/ACEC Liaison and Education Committees. He has also served on the Circle T MUD Board and as Chairman of the Rhome Planning and Zoning Committee. Mark holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from Texas A&M University.

Five miles of M-24 (Lapeer Road) in Oakland County have been repaired and resurfaced by the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) to enhance rideability, longevity and traffic operations. With an average daily traffic use of 50,000 vehicles per day in some areas, this is one of the busiest stretches of state highway, extending from Harmon Road in the City of Auburn Hills to Goldengate Street in Orion Township. The $34 million project has restored the roadway and improved traffic flow through the corridor by changing how major intersections and turnarounds are configured.

Complete reconstruction of the Silver Bell Road and Clarkston Road intersections was designed to improve safety and operations. Through-lanes were added to M-24 and direct left-turns were eliminated at each intersection. Indirect left-turn lanes at adjacent crossovers (Michigan Lefts) were added to enable the corridor to operate as a true boulevard system and allow more time for through traffic to proceed through intersections. Right-turn lanes were also added in some areas to separate slow-turning traffic from higher-speed vehicles on the roadway.

Patching and resurfacing of the remaining portions of the roadway with hot-mix asphalt (HMA) has improved rideability and longevity. Geometric features were updated to current standards including shoulders, intersections, driveways and crossovers. In addition, the design enhanced connectivity of a safety path on the east side of the road, improved roadway drainage and water main, and added new traffic signals in a box-span configuration.

After the major roadway construction activities were completed, two water quality enhancements were constructed to complement the operational improvements, alleviate flooding issues and meet Michigan Department of Environmental Quality permit requirements. A natural stream channel was created parallel to M-24 to mitigate impacts on an existing stream from the road reconstruction and expansion. This type of enhancement is one of the first to be implemented by MDOT. In addition, a series of bioretention basins was installed to manage stormwater runoff from the roadway and capture the first flush of runoff from the contributing drainage areas.

The roadway fully opened to traffic in November 2016 and final site restoration and plantings are anticipated to take place in Spring 2017.

Roadway, pedestrian and aesthetic upgrades completed along the SR 585 corridor through the City of Tampa’s Ybor City District transformed this former truck route into an inviting, historic neighborhood corridor that supports all users and modes of transportation, safety, economic growth and livability. The SR 585 Corridor Modification project received the 2016 Hillsborough County City-County Planning Commission Chairman’s Award for excellence in planning and design, contributing to a better quality of life, and serving as a model to learn from and emulate.

Heavy truck traffic on SR 585 (21st and 22nd Streets) through Ybor City between I-4 and the Port of Tampa divided and eroded this National Historic Landmark District for decades. Completion of the I-4 Connector diverted most truck traffic off local roads and made the SR 585 Corridor Modification project possible. Wade Trim worked with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District 7, City of Tampa, Ybor City Development Corporation, Barrio Latino Commission, and local businesses and residents, to restore this transportation corridor. Extending 2.75 miles from SR 60 to SR 600, the project narrowed and enhanced the corridor through a “roadway diet” and a “complete streets” design approach to accommodate pedestrians, bicyclists and public transportation, while transferring ownership from FDOT to the City of Tampa.

Three distinct sections defined the project. A one-way pair from SR 60 to 14th Avenue, was reduced from three lanes each way to two lanes with on-street parking, bicycle lanes and wider sidewalks. The section from 14th Avenue to 21st Avenue was changed to a two-lane roadway with a designated bike lane. Finally, from MLK Jr. Boulevard to SR 600, the addition of sidewalks and high visibility mid-block cross walks at a high school and transit bus bay completed the pedestrian-friendly corridor.

A comprehensive public involvement program was implemented to address the desires and concerns of stakeholders and local community organizations. Construction sequencing and a Maintenance of Traffic Plan minimized the economic impact of construction by maintaining business access and traffic capacity. New hardscape and landscape elements, including historical five-globe lighting, granite curb, and recycled brick paver crosswalks, were selected to reflect the area’s culture and history while maintaining current standards.

The existing 100-year-old storm sewer system was retrofitted to accommodate the narrower roadway, and new LED mast-arm mounted traffic signal displays and LED pedestrian count-down displays were installed. To satisfy ADA requirements, extensive cross slope analysis was performed to design a suitable street curb profile and drainage that accommodated opposing changes in curb elevation from the reduced road width and sidewalk widening.

To further support safety on the enhanced multi-modal facility, the City will prohibit through trucks on the roadway, diverting non-local truck traffic to the I-4 Connector.

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Representatives from the Florida Department of Transportation District 7, City of Tampa and Wade Trim accepted the award from Chairman Mitch Thrower (far right).

Michigan State University (MSU) is building a new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), a world-leading facility for nuclear science research. Scheduled to open in 2022, the FRIB is expected to be accessed by approximately 400 employees each week day and visited by more than 3,000 people annually. Wade Trim was retained by MSU to identify the transportation needs required to accommodate increased traffic flow resulting from the facility.

A traffic study was conducted to identify roadway improvements including the extension of Wilson Road, a four-lane boulevard, and the construction of Conrad Road, a new three-lane road. Both roads will have bike lanes in each direction and be controlled by semi-actuated and fully-actuated traffic signals. In addition, turn lanes will be installed along Shaw Lane at Conrad Road, Hagadorn Road at Shaw Lane and at the new Wilson Road. These improvements will require reconfiguration of the adjacent campus parking areas and associated green space and recreational fields.

The traffic study also helped secure a $3 million Transportation Economic Development Fund grant from the Michigan Department of Transportation. Wade Trim is currently providing design and construction administration for the improvements to be constructed in 2018.